Katja Grace at the Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford and fellow authors surveyed the world’s leading researchers in artificial intelligence by asking them when they think intelligent machines will better humans in a wide range of tasks. They averaged the answers, and published them at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1705.08807.pdfThe results are… surprising.

First up, AIs will reach human proficiency in the game of Go in 2027… wait, what? Ah, but this survey was conducted in 2015. As I noted in Crisis of Control, before AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol in 2016, it was expected to be a decade before that happened; here’s the numeric proof. This really shows what a groundbreaking achievement that was, to blindside so many experts.

Forty-eight percent of respondents think that research on minimizing the risks of AI should be prioritized by society more than the status quo. And when they analyzed the results by demographics, only one factor was significant: geography. Asian researchers think human level machine intelligence will be achieved much sooner:Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 12.58.26 PM

Amusingly, their predictions for when different types of job will be automated are relatively clustered under 50 years from now with one far outlier over 80:  Apparently, the job of “AI Researcher” will take longer to automate that anything else, including surgeon. Might be a bit of optimism at work there…

 

Posted by Peter Scott

Peter Scott’s résumé reads like a Monty Python punchline: half business coach, half information technology specialist, half teacher, three-quarters daddy. After receiving a master’s degree in Computer Science from Cambridge University, he has worked for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as an employee and contractor for over thirty years, helping advance our exploration of the Solar System. Over the years, he branched out into writing technical books and training. Yet at the same time, he developed a parallel career in “soft” fields of human development, getting certifications in NeuroLinguistic Programming from founder John Grinder and in coaching from the International Coaching Federation. In 2007 he co-created a convention honoring the centennial of the birth of author Robert Heinlein, attended by over 700 science fiction fans and aerospace experts, a unique fusion of the visionary with the concrete. Bridging these disparate worlds positions him to envisage a delicate solution to the existential crises facing humanity. He lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife and two daughters, writing the Human Cusp blog on dealing with exponential change.

One Comment

  1. […] Human Cusp: A blog focusing on possibilities for superintelligent AI. Touched on the special case of Go, and how AI in fact surpassed humans much faster than AI researchers predicted. […]

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